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Fort Scratchley anti-Supercars graffiti a ‘p*** poor effort’photos

Fort Scratchley anti-Supercars graffiti a ‘p*** poor effort’ | photos PROTEST: “NO V8” graffiti on a wall of Fort Scratchley.
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FURIOUS: Forts Scratchley Historical Society members Frank Carter and Graham Postlethwaite at the site of the partially-cleared graffiti on Monday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

NOT HERE: East End resident Mark Burslem with his protest banner about the November Supercars race. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

SIMILAR: Anti-Supercars graffiti on the facade of the United Service Club.

SIMILAR: Anti-Supercars graffiti on the facade of the United Service Club.

TweetFacebookFURIOUS FortScratchley volunteers have calledanti-V8 Supercarsgraffitisprayedon a wall of the historic structurea “p*** poor effort”.

The yellow painted “NO V8” tag –which appeared on Sunday and was partially cleared by Newcastle council workers byMonday–angered Fort Scratchley Historical Society president Frank Carter.

The graffiti,apparently inprotest ofthe V8 Supercars race to be held inNewcastle Eastin November,was similar to thatspray-paintedonthe United Service Club building in Watt Street on Sunday.

“They’re entitled to their feelings, but when you vandalise places like the fort and the United Service Club,you’re not doing your cause any good,” Mr Carter said.

“You would like to think, whoever it is, they’re in the minority.”

Fortcommittee member Graham Postlethwaite said therace’s opponents had a “democratic right” to protest on their property, but not onthe city’s significant sites.

“It’s a p*** poor bloody effort, and it deserves more expletives than that,” MrPostlethwaite said.

Both Mr Carter and MrPostlethwaite said they personallywelcomedtheNewcastleround of the Supercars Championshipfor the exposure it wouldgivethe city, but that ascaretakers of the fort they had to “walk a fine line”.

Mark Burslem, whose East End terrace will front the V8 circuit, has a banner above his front door that reads “V8 WRONG PLACE”.

He said he didn’t know who vandalisedthe fort or the United ServiceClub, but it didn’t surprise him.

“It’s unfortunateand it’s disappointing, but you can understand when people feel disempowered that something like this might happen,”Mr Burslem said.

The East End local will move his family to Anna Bayfor five weeks either side of the mid-November race weekend, while V8 fanfriends from Dubbostay inthe house.

The street modifications necessary for Newcastle Eastto host therace will permanentlychange the neighbourhood, Mr Burslem said, and make it more suited to being held in Raymond Terrace.

His protesthas been largelysupported by locals and passers-by, but attracted “threatening, and just vile” hate emails from Supercars supporters.

Mr Burslem said he believed the season-ending Supercars race could still be moved, despite theNSW governmentpassinglegislation in February cementing itsmove from Sydney to Newcastle.

“There are people who’ve been here since the ‘70s and stopped the bulldozers then, and now [the East End] isa jewel of the city,” Mr Burslem said.

“We’re not going to give up.”

Vandals spray United Service Club with anti-Supercars graffiti

Newcastle team to save orangutanPHOTOS

Newcastle team to save orangutan | PHOTOS Help Needed: A team is being established in the Hunter to help save the orangutan.
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TweetFacebookHome Sweet HomeWhile we’re in the animal world, take a look at these native bees that have taken up residence in a power pole at Adamstown Heights.

Herald photographer Max Mason-Hubers, who has a keen eye for interesting things in the natural world, spotted the bees.

Max pointed out that it was quite unusual to see native bees living in a colony.

There are 1500 native bee species in Australia and most are solitary.

“Solitary bees do not have queens and workers. Instead in most species, just one female bee mates with a male and then builds an individual nest for her eggs, just like a bird does,” aussiebee南京夜网419论坛 said.

The Mining VirusNewcastle writer Barbara Heaton, well known in union and activist circles, is writing a biography of the late, great Hunter resident Jim Comerford.

Jim, who died in 2006 at age 93, was a highly respected union leader who dedicated much of his life to chronicling the region’s mining history.

Barbara found a statement of Jim’s from 1994, which she described as “prescient”.

“Cargo cultism is characteristic of all governments in capitalistic societies. Unbridled mining activity is one aspect of the ‘pennies from heaven’ outlook. Next to war, mining industries are the most wasteful and damaging activities of all. The mining virus is more potent in Australia than anywhere else… and more potent in Queensland, where governments and mining companies have always been close.”

Sounds to Topics like one of those moments where someone leans across and says: “Don’t hold back mate, tell us what you really think”.

[email protected]南京夜网419论坛 Bee’s Knees: Native bees living in a power pole. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers.

One in 10 new Australian homes could be pre-assembled in a factory by 2027

Prefab creations give conventional homes a run for their moneySix prefab homes shaping the future of construction as building revolution takes offMuji want you to live in their new prefab model home for free
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More than 10 per cent of new Australian homes could be prefabs in 10 years’ time, moved to site after being built and assembled in a factory, says an industry expert.

And the cost-savings for home-buyers could be up to 25 per cent with more manufacturing-type companies moving into construction, and proving as disruptive as Uber was in the transport space.

“It isn’t the complete solution to the problems of housing affordability, but it’s part of the solution,” says Warren McGregor, the CEO of prefabAUS, the industry body whose membership has doubled in the last 12 months to 200 organisations all involved, or interested in, the future of prefabricated housing.

“Obviously there are other issues like the scarcity and price of land in some areas, but even if you just save 10 per cent on the cost of a home, then that can be a wonderful contributor.

“The forecast of a 10 per cent growth in 10 years isn’t outrageous at all, especially when you have more manufacturing companies coming in and changing the kind of business models construction has always worked with.”

Prefab housing – also known as modular or off-site construction – has long been a massive part of the residential market in many regions overseas, accounting for 80 per cent of homes in Sweden and 15 per cent in Japan, with numbers rising rapidly across Europe and Asia.

In Australia, however, it’s been slower to take off, currently accounting for just 3 per cent of homes built, and usually for single custom-built, architecture-designed homes. Yet that’s a figure that’s about to jump exponentially, according to many in the industry.

A major research project is currently being conducted by the University of Melbourne into the practice and economics of prefab construction, there’s a study tour by major players to Sweden in May, state governments are becoming interested as lower-cost solutions to scale housing and big developers are investing a lot more into research and development. In addition, home-buyers themselves are becoming much less sceptical about the quality of pre-made housing.

“I think here we’re used to thinking about prefabs in terms of transportable homes, schools or mining camps,” says Bill McCorkell, an architect by profession and a builder by trade who runs prefab company ArchiBlox. “Australia has been lagging behind other countries in exposure and take-up but now I think we’re becoming early adopters in the industry and so many more people are showing interest.

“From a quality point of view, it’s a method that makes absolute sense. Constructing in our facilities means we have the ability to manage the day-to-day trades – the tilers, plasterers etc – who work on our homes so much more easily and ensure quality work. In the domestic industry, you need a project manager as tradies move from site-to-site and often blame each other for shortcomings in quality.”

Sweden is certainly leading the way, probably because their long, cruel winters and short summers aren’t conducive to building homes on site outdoors. In Australia, with much more clement weather, that hasn’t proved a major driver.

We’ve also become good at building our traditional brick veneer and terracotta-tiled homes pretty cheaply too, says Jan Gyrn, managing director of Modscape. “I think we’ve become accustomed to that as our residential model and they’re building them at a fairly low price point.

“But now in Australia we’re starting to see a lot of cheaper component-part-pre-fabricated companies start to emerge in the residential market. And while at the moment prefab methods have taken off for the bespoke homes built to sit in the landscape, I think we’ll start to see a lot more growth in the project home market as well.

“After all, our homes take 12 weeks to build rather than 12 months, are installed in a day and finished off in two to three weeks. The forecast is that the numbers will grow to 10 per cent in the next 10 years, which is rapid growth.”

As the operations of major Japanese house-builder Sekisui House, which has a large prefab division, increase in Australia after its purchase of A.V. Jenning in 2009 and its partnerships with many of our large developers, such as Frasers Property Australia and Lend Lease, that’s likely to further spur change.

Any worries about longevity of modular housing will also be assuaged, believes Peter Smith, founder and director of Unibuild Technology. “My first prefab building was in Canberra, and it’s still looking good 48 years later,” he says. “We’re now leading a new charge on pre-fab housing and it’s now becoming much more popular.”

Cost considerations could prove another boost, too. Melbourne-based McCorkell estimates overall cost savings could be as high as 25 per cent, taking into account that, with his firm, architecture design costs are included in the building cost, the less money spent on project managing on site, and the ease of using the same trades at the same venue who aren’t as expensive as Sydney tradies.

Most importantly, the time on site is cut enormously, meaning people can live in an old house until the last possible minute when their new home is ready for delivery, and then have it pulled down ready for the next. A house he’s just about to truck to Sydney’s Mosman, for instance, will be put up on site in two to three days, with decking and the veranda taking just a couple of weeks.

“As higher volumes of homes are made this way, you’ll be able to produce them more cheaply with economies of scale,” he says. “The market is growing and I think it’ll grow faster into the future.” This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Exhibition showcases military historyPHOTOS

PIECE OF HISTORY: Greg Ingle with a 100-year-bugle used in World War 1. Local ex-serviceman Greg Ingle has been collecting military memorabilia for almost 50 years.
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He will display his vast collection this Saturday in a free exhibition at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

Among the thousands of medals, patches, badges,figurines, photographs, uniforms and weapons are some incredible items that were used in historic battles.

Mr Ingle has acquired a Japanese samurai sword used in Papau New Guinea duringWorld War II.

Another item from the second World War is a German hand-stick grenade.

Mr Ingle’s pride and joy is a 100-year-old bugle from World War I, used by the Camel Corps in the Magdhaba Battle in Egypt.

It will be the first time Mr Ingle has held an exhibition on his own to showcase his collection.

He began to accumulate memorabilia when he first joined the army in 1970.

Mr Ingle said he started the collection because he wanted to “keep the Anzac legend alive”.

Since then he has bought items, had pieces donated to him and saved things that people would have otherwise thrown away.

Mr Ingle said he wanted to put on the display to bring Australian history to life .

He said he hoped people saw a different side of the armed forces when they saw the collection.

“I hope people learn that war’s not just about killing,” he said.

“It was about friendship. There were a lot of different things involved.”

The auditorium will be filled with collectables from every conflict from World War I right through to Iraq and Afghanistan.

The club itself is already almost a military museum.

Photographs and other war keepsakes adorn the walls and fill cabinets all around the building.

Mr Ingle said people who go along on Saturday will be able to look ateverything on display. Children are also welcome to attend the exhibition.

Mr Ingle said he hoped for a large crowd of people. He also wants to hold more exhibitions in the future.

Doors open at the club at 9am. There will be a raffle throughout the day.

Exhibition showcases military history | PHOTOS WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club. The World War I honour board that was recently installed at the club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club. The World War I honour board that was recently installed at the club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club. Private Greg Ingle on the right, his uncle Private Donald Hamilton in the middle, and Greg’s grandfather Trooper John Hamilton on the left.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM: Greg Ingle’s Anzac memorabilia on display at Cessnock Ex-Services Club.

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Bird pays Knights a flying visit

THE Knights have upped the ante in their bid to sign Jack Bird after inviting the Cronulla dynamo to Newcastle last weekend for a guided tour of the club and the city.
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TARGET: Jack Bird

As was the case when they signed North Queensland teenage tyro Kalyn Ponga, Newcastle are understood to have laid on the VIP treatment for Bird, which included using some of the club’s all-time greats to help with their sales pitch.

TheHeraldhas been told that Bird will become the highest-paid player in Newcastle’s history if he agrees to move north, and the deal could be worth close to $1 million a season.

Knights coach Nathan Brown was initially reluctant to comment on Bird’s visit – which occurred less than 24 hours after the Sharks beat Newcastle 19-18 on Saturday –saying only:”Birdy might have popped about somewhere here or there.’’

Brown eventually confirmed Bird was in town but said the utility back was “no closer to his decision, that’s what I can honestly tell you”.

Cronulla remain hopeful of retaining their 2016 grand final centre, while Parramatta are also reported to have expressed interest.

Brown felt Newcastle were “a rough chance” of signing Bird but added: “He doesn’t really give much away, Birdy.”

The Knights hope they can tempt Bird with weight of money and also an opportunity to play his preferred position, five-eighth.

“He’s a player that we feel could certainly help our squad move forward,’’ Brown said.

“He’d be a marquee signing, but Jack will make his decision over time.

“Obviously we’d love him to come, but where he goes and what he does, that’s no further down the track than we were a few weeks ago …

“He’s going to make a decision based on what he thinks is in his best interests over the next three or four years.

“Hopefully it’s with us.’’

After consecutive seasons aswooden spooners, Newcastle have experienced difficulty in recruiting top-end talent, but Brown was hopeful that signing Bird would be a catalyst for change.

“The rebuilding phase we’re in, it’s [about] trying to get that one player over the line and that can lead to a number of others coming,’’ Brown said.

“Obviously for us, it would be more important if it did happen in the short term for the fact that other players that we’re looking at and talking to would know that Birdy is coming and see that as a great sign.’’

Cronulla chief executive Lyall Gorman told theHeraldlast week that he was unconcerned if Newcastle were in position to outbid the Sharks for Bird’s signature.

“There’s a whole range of things that players consider,”Gormansaid. “It’s not just necessarily about the financial side of things … it comes down to the overall package.’’

The Knights acknowledge one challenge they face is the bond Bird shares with his premiership-winning teammates.

Mate charged over assault

Newcastle courthouse. A MAN accused of punching his mate –causing him to fall back, hit his head and fracture his skull –during a drunkenargument at Merewether over the weekend has been granted bail.
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Matt Alexander Stephenson, 29, of Merewether,appeared in Newcastle Local Court on Monday charged with an offence of grievous bodily harm by unlawful act.

Mr Stephenson’s matesuffered a fractured skull and bleeding on the brain when he was knocked to the ground outside a home in Mitchell Street about 3.45am on Sunday morning, court documents state.

Police say they were contacted by ambulance paramedics who said they had been called to a man unconscious with a head wound.

But when police arrived,torrential rain had washed away any potential crime scene and they were told the alleged victim, 28, had already been taken to hospital.

While police were at the hospital, Mr Stephenson is accused of calling triple-zero and telling them he had a fight with his friend, who was knocked out.

“The accused was very distressed and wanted to hand himself into police,” according to a statement of police facts.

Mr Stephenson was arrested about 5am and breath-tested, returning a reading of 0.165, court documents state.

Mr Stephenson was very emotional during the journey to Newcastle police station, telling police officers: “It was just a stupid argument. It got out of hand”, according to documents tendered in court.

Mr Stephenson told police the fight started when he took offence to something the alleged victim had done.

The pair went outside onto Mitchell Street alone, faced off and both shaped up to punch each other, Mr Stephenson allegedly told police.

He said he threw the first punch, striking the alleged victim to the head, which caused him to fall back and hit his head on the roadway, court documents state.

Mr Stephenson said he then went to get help from some friends.

But police say they have spoken to a witness who provided a different version of events.

The witness claims to have seen two males facing each other and could hear them yelling.

“[The alleged victim] had his hands down and made no move towards the accused,”according to a statement of police facts.

“The accused struck [the alleged victim] in the head and that when this happened [the alleged victim] just dropped and hit his head.”

Mr Stephenson spentSunday night in the Newcastle courthouse cells.

His barrister, Peter Harper, applied for bail on his behalf on Monday,submitting that, if released,his client would not consume alcohol, forfeit his passport and report to police among other conditions.

Magistrate Robert Stone granted Mr Stephenson conditional bail, noting he did not have a history of violence.

The matter was adjourned to April 13 when Mr Stephenson is expected to enter a plea to the charge, which carries a maximum penalty of two years in jail.

Fake doctor Shyam Acharya fined after working in NSW health system

A fraudster who stole a doctor’s identity and credentials before working undetected for more than a decade in the NSW health system has been fined $30,000.
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Shyam Acharya fled Australia in January, three days after he was served with a court attendance notice for a charge relating to him falsely representing himself as a doctor.

It later emerged that, between 2003 and 2014, he worked at hospitals in Manly, Hornsby, Gosford, Wyong and Mona Vale using the identity of British-based doctor Sarang Chitale.

Acharya stole Dr Chitale’s university degrees and medical certification when the pair lived together, with Dr Chitale’s grandmother, in India between 1999 and 2000.

Acharya later obtained Australian citizenship using Dr Chitale’s name.

A NSW Police strike force has been set up to try to hunt Acharya down after he left the country.

In the Downing Centre Local Court on Monday, the fake doctor was convicted and fined in his absence for the “blatant” misrepresentation.

The charge of claiming he was authorised to work as a medical practitioner without being registered, was brought on by the Australia Health Practitioner Regulation Agency.

Natasha Blake, acting for the agency, said Acharya had held himself out as a medical practitioner.

“What we are dealing with is, for a period in excess of 10 years, a person operating under the stolen identity of a overseas doctor has participated in the public health system,” she told the court.

The court heard Acharya worked for NSW Health, including as a senior medical registrar at Wyong and a trainee registrar in the intensive care unit at Hornsby, until 2015.

He was then employed as a medical director at Novotech, a research company, until September 2016.

Novotech discovered he had the same medical registration in Britain as the real Dr Chitale, a British resident.

Acharya claimed on his CV he had a string of university degrees, including an MBA and another obtained in India.

Magistrate Jennifer Atkinson said inquiries were made with Dr Chitale’s supervisor in Britain and it became apparent Acharya was using his identity.

Ms Atkinson said that, while the actual offence was limited to July-September 2016, when Acharya was at Novotech, she acknowledged he had practised medicine in Australia for years before that.

She found the offence was of the most serious level and warranted the maximum penalty of a $30,000 fine.

She also ordered Acharya pay the prosecution costs of more than $22,000.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jaffas accept send-off decision

Lambton Jaffas coach James Pascoe hadno issue with Brad Swancott copping astraight red card for calling a linesman a ‘t—’ on Saturday but hopes the goalkeeper will be free to return soon.
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Lambton Jaffas goalkeeper Brad Swancott.

Swancott, 37,was sent off in the 37thminute for directing the derogatory term, more commonly used in the UK, at the linesman for not calling a Valentine player offside before he was awarded a free kick.The Jaffas, who trailed 1-0 at the time, hit back through two penalties to lead 2-1 before Valentine struck twice late to win 3-2.

The send off of Swancott, a former national league player atNewcastle, for using the term, which was audible on BarTV footage, was a major talking point out of round four.Pascoe, though, had no problem was the decision.

“I think he crossed the line, to be fair, and I think he’ll acknowledge that he crossed the line,” Pascoe said.“You can’t speak directly to an official like that.

“Once he cooled down, he realised he’d let himself down and everyone associated with the club down.”

He said the comment was “inexcusable” but he hoped the context of Swancott’s frustrationwould be considered in dealing out a penalty.

“Their striker clearly came from an offside position to get involved in play,” he said. “If that player stays of it, it doesn’t evolve.”

Match officials abuse carries a two-game ban. Under revised rules this year, teamscan lose three competition points if their players are guilty ofmatch official abuse more than twice.

Clubs can be fined $2000 for each incident past two of match official abuseacross all grades, senior and youth.

Last year, first-grade sides faced the possibility of losing competition points for a third instance of match official abuse across all senior and youth grades at their club. This was changed for 2017 after feedback from clubs.

Deal or no deal? Stefanovic and Jeffreys give wedding vendors generous TV plug

Karl Stefanovic admitted his family “don’t pay for shit,” so is that why Peter Stefanovic and Sylvia Jeffreys used the reach of the Today show on Channel Nine to promote their wedding vendors?
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Two days after they said “I do” at the $6500 per night Ooralba Estate in Kangaroo Valley, NSW, the pair appeared on the breakfast show with the scenic venue in the background. Standing arm-in-arm, and looking a little tired after the weekend’s festivities, they thanked their well-wishers and plugged their location.

“If you are thinking of locations to get married, the beautiful Kangaroo Valley, where we are at the moment, is primo,” Peter told Today’s viewers on Monday morning.

“It’s gorgeous,” Sylvia added.

Next up was the services of Today’s sport presenter, Tim Gilbert, as a master of ceremonies.

“If you are looking for a high-quality, very smart, very intelligent, very clever, very witty, very funny emcee, who ticks all of the boxes, then Tim Gilbert is certainly your man,” Peter continued.

No word on his prices, though.

Peter’s older brother Karl, who acted as groomsman, and his co-host Lisa Wilkinson, also helped out with the wedding flogging.

Broadcasting their Monday show from a rainy Bowral, just a 45-minute drive from the wedding location, Karl described the Southern Highlands as “the perfect place to get married” following a clip of Wilkinson’s promotional tour of the area.

They also gave Rebecca Vallance, Sylvia’s wedding and bridesmaids’ dresses designer, a name-check.

The designer also issued her own statement about the creation of the dress and is now available for interview about it.

Peter’s suit provider, Armani, was also mentioned on Today, at the same time as a picture of the pair with the vendors tagged came up on screen.

In case there was any doubt about who supplied what, Nine’s publicity team issued a statement to media just hours after the ceremony on Saturday with a list of vendors, including: rings, flowers, photography, entertainment, catering, wedding planning, and hair and makeup.

Despite dedicating almost 10 minutes to extolling the virtues of the wedding location and some of the vendors at the prime time of just before 8am, a Nine spokesperson claimed to Fairfax Media on Monday that no deals were made by the newlyweds.

“There were no deals done for the location, services provided for the wedding or anything else, for inclusion in the coverage on the Today show,” they said.

“That coverage was in response to media coverage of the events and then feedback from our viewers who wanted to know more.

“Sylvia and Peter consciously chose to do no commercial deals around their wedding.”

“We got beautiful heads / we don’t pay for s–t / agents deliver it / Oh why, why, why? / Because they know why,” Karl and brother Tom Stefanovic sang to the tune of Oasis’ Champagne Supernova during the wedding speeches.

Do you know more? Email [email protected]南京夜网419论坛.Another beautiful moment from Pete & Sylvia’s wedding…and another look at her stunning @rebeccavallance gown. Rebecca also created the exquisite bridesmaid’s dresses. Incredibly beautiful, no? #weddingday #wedding #weddingdress #happyA post shared by Lisa Wilkinson (@lisa_wilkinson) on Apr 2, 2017 at 4:07am PDTA post shared by Lisa Wilkinson (@lisa_wilkinson) on Apr 2, 2017 at 12:28am PDTThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Eight money tips for flood victims

For many caught in the trail of Cyclone Debbie and its aftermath, the next few days, weeks and months can be difficult and confusing with a number of financial issues to address.
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Some will deal with severe financial loss and some will need to reassess their ability to recover and move on.

Regardless of how badly you have been affected, it’s important to keep in mind that there are some steps you should consider in light of any natural disaster.

Don’t rush

The most valuable advice is to take time to think through your situation, absorb what has happened, and seek advice. Don’t make any important financial decisions in the wake of a disaster as these can sometimes be made irrationally. A little bit of time will give you clarity.

Assess your finances

The first step on the road to recovering financially is to formulate a plan for managing your income, expenses and any loans you may have. If you’re in need of cash, determine whether you’re eligible for disaster relief funds from federal, state, or local governments. Ensure you make every effort to keep up with bills and if you are struggling, contact suppliers to explain the situation and consider a payment plan.

Contact insurers

Assess your losses and contact your insurer to lodge your claim quickly. Don’t panic if you don’t have your policy numbers or documents as your insurers will have these records. Claims are frequently settled in the order in which they are received so be as helpful as you can with any documentation they require. If you do not have a list of all household items, check your photos taken in your home that may help to support your claim.

Consider your work

Ensure you keep your employer up to speed with your situation if you need some extra time off. If you’ve been injured and cannot work, check your personal insurance.

Replace important documents

Assess the loss of important documents such as your driver’s licence, passport, concession cards, bank statements, investment documentation and recent bills. Make a list of such documents as best you can and make the phone calls necessary to obtain copies.

Your insurance coverage

Insurance is sometimes only valued when it comes to claim time and a disaster brings an opportunity to reconsider the role of your own insurance going forward. Evaluate whether you have the right type and amount and talk to your insurer if you feel as though you have some gaps.

An emergency fund

Once you have recovered from the disaster, take some steps to ensure you have a buffer or emergency fund equal to three to eight months of your living expenses. Keep these funds secure and easily accessible in a high interest account or offset account.

Ask for help

If you have been through a traumatic experience, don’t underestimate the effect this may have on you emotionally. Seek help from local counselling services and don’t hesitate to reach out.

Why not increase the financial savviness of those around you – pay it forward and pass on these tips to your family, friends and kids.

Olivia Maragna is the co-founder of Aspire Retire Financial Services and is a respected and independent financial expert. Olivia’s advice is general in nature and readers should seek their own professional advice before making any financial decisions.

You can follow Olivia on Facebook or Twitter at https://twitter南京夜网/oliviamaragna

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Green light for surrogate babies to leave Cambodia

Cambodia’s strongman leader, Hun Sen, has approved a strategy to allow surrogacy-born babies with Australian biological parents to leave the capital, Phnom Penh.
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The move will come as a relief for up to 70 Australian couples, most of whom faced financial and family hardships trying to get their babies home from the impoverished nation.

Some of the couples have been trying for months to get approval through Cambodia’s corrupt and dysfunctional legal system for their babies to leave.

As a human crisis developed, fears were held for twins who are expected to soon be born prematurely, requiring high levels of neo-natal care.

“Such care is not always available in Cambodia, so the ability to transfer these cases to higher-care hospitals internationally will be vital,” said Sam Everingham, global director of the Australian consultancy Families Through Surrogacy.

Chou Bun Eng, Cambodia’s secretary of state with the Interior Ministry, said the measures would be temporary.

“The validity of the announcement will be for nine months and 10 days ??? if a baby is born after the date of the announcement, that’s an abuse,” she said.

Late last year, Cambodia’s government declared that commercial surrogacy was illegal and would be treated as human trafficking, and cracked down on about 50 surrogacy operators in Phnom Penh.

Police arrested Australian nurse Tammy Davis-Charles, whose company, Fertility Solutions PGD, allegedly signed at least 20 surrogacy agreements in the country, most of them with Australian couples who paid $US50,000 per baby.

Ms Bun Eng said that under the exit strategy, biological parents would have to satisfy the requirements of Cambodia’s criminal and civil laws, which stipulate that any newborn belongs to the birth mother.

The Australians will have to prove a biological link to the baby through DNA testing, as well as obtain the surrogate’s approval for the baby to be handed over.

Similar strategies were implemented in Thailand after its military government cracked down on a booming surrogacy industry in Bangkok after the baby Gammy scandal.

Ms Bun Eng warned against biological parents attempting to bypass the Cambodian procedures by taking babies to Vietnam or Thailand, where the Australian embassies are reportedly granting documents for them to travel to Australia.

“We think this is against the law with ill-intended purpose,” she said, adding that intending parents who do not come forward to use the exit strategy would face serious consequences.

“If they try to hide, they have no right to take the baby out,” Ms Bun Eng told the Cambodia Daily newspaper.

The Daily quoted an unnamed surrogacy expert saying surrogates who have given birth in Cambodia have been obtaining Cambodian passports for the baby and then travelling to Vietnam with the biological parents.

Mr Everingham said the Cambodian government had been too slow in coming up with a strategy, which had “caused great stress to many Cambodian surrogates and their intending parents”.

He said the announcement would be welcomed by “dozens of Cambodian surrogates and intended parents around the world, but particularly in Australia, who have been awaiting news on this issue for months”.

Ms Davis-Charles, the mother of twins born through surrogacy, is in jail awaiting trial on charges that could result in her being sentenced to up to two years in prison.

Her lawyer, Chheang Sophoan, said the investigation had closed and a judge had already submitted the case to a trial that is expected to be held in late April.

“If it drags longer, it could violate her rights,” he said.

The Australian government has warned its citizens not to enter into surrogacy agreements in such countries as Cambodia, where no laws exist to cover the practice.

But surrogacy groups say some of the operators who have been chased out of India, Nepal, Thailand and Cambodia have now turned to Laos to set up businesses attracting foreign clients.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Short Takes

THEY can’t help it can they? We’ve all seen it in work and in life. Those who gain a position where responsible behaviour is replaced by a sense of entitlement. The lord mayor and Newcastle councillors need to acknowledge why they were elected. To maintain and improve the basic infrastructure of our city and to ensure that every cent that was raised in rates is used in Newcastle for that purpose. Not on overseas trips, probiotic water and lobster canapes.
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Ann Ellis,MerewetherAS the ancients already knew “All roads lead to Damascus”.

Jo Coombes,Mayfield WestI CAN’T believe how ill informed some people are. Peter Grant (Short Takes, 6/4) it was the Labor government that built a single lane each way bridge when they were in power, prior to the current government.

Robert Dixon, MorpethHOW differently we see things. Regarding the article in the Herald about the film Beauty and the Beast(‘The alluring misogyny of Beauty and the Beast’, Herald,7/4). The things I took from the film was the love Belle and her father shared, the loyalty of the servants of the Beast and the inclusion of so many people of different cultures and persuasions as seen in the final scenes. Some see the worst in everything. I went with five other older ladies and we all loved it.

Diana Taaffe, Belmont NorthMY regular walk takes me past Newcastle council roadworks at the corner of Watkins and Patrick streets in The Junction. Last Saturday,two council employees were taking measurements. I passed the spot on Monday and Friday noticing no work had progressed. On Saturday, I walked by and three council employees were taking measurements in the same spot. I surmised they must have lost last Saturday’s measurement and were doing it again with three employees: one to hold the tape, one to call the measurement, and one to write it down so it wouldn’t get lost again. Whatever the reason, in my opinion, it is another example of the almost wanton waste of ratepayer’s money.

Robert McCormack, NewcastleI’M Liberal through and through Colin Geatches (Short Takes, 8/4) but I won’t be voting for Brad Luke this time–so we’re even.

Mac Maguire, CharlestownIN my view, the Iraq war, a war based on lies, has created more terror, and terrorists worldwide. The dropping of bombs on people in Iraq, was that not terrorism? For the record, Iraq is now a breeding ground for terrorism, a terrorist state. Blaming Islam for terrorism, is like blaming Christianity for slavery.

Richard Ryan, Summerland PointI WRITE in reply to Anne Henderson (Short Takes, 8/4): You live in Lake Macquarie. Ibet your lord mayor doesn’t spend like ours.

Colin Geatches, MayfieldTHE POLLSAre you glad Danny Levi re-signed with the Newcastle Knights?

Yes 93%,No 7%

Short Takes

EASTER is coming and the old negative theories are trotted out again (Letters, 5/4).The Old Testament foretold more than 200 references to the birth, life, crucifixion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and they all came to pass. People need to read the complete story before going into print.
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Rose Latimer,MetfordI READ about the woman complaining about the ukulele players. She wants to be thankful they weren’t bagpipes. I’d suggest she gets down to her music shop, buys one and joins them, she might enjoy herself.

John Keen,GatesheadGOOD on you Nuatali, at least you are spending money around the city. The council isn’t.

Raymond Clark,MerewetherI’VE been asked several times to stop whinging about the V8 event. I have made several attempts to raise the issue of duty of care for the elderly and frail. Supercars, NCC and DNSW have now been passed the mic. What do they have to say? What is their plan A? What is their plan B? I am now quietly waiting for an answer.

Scott Cooper-Johnston,NewcastleNUATALI Nelmes: You paid $905 on car washes? Ever heard of a bucket of soapy water and a sponge? I’m Labor to my core, but you will never ever get my vote again.

Colin Geatches,MayfieldMARRIAGE is under attack. Everyone should be given the chance to preserve it by saying “No change to marriage”.

Clive Jensen,MerewetherALTON Bowen (Letters, 7/4) the best thing about being an atheist is that I can sleep well knowing that no children have been slaughtered in the name of my faith.

Steve Barnett,Fingal BayI AGREE with Garry Robinson (Letters, 7/4). I find the lord mayor’s expenditure quite reasonable for her position. Maybe they’re right, Newcastle is becoming a bunch of whingers. I think maybe there’s another agenda here trying to discredit her at every chance.

Anne Henderson,BelmontOH how sad. The article about misogyny and Beauty and the Beast by Dr Kim Huynh(‘The alluring misogyny of Beauty and the Beast’, Herald,7/4) is demonstrating how much the fact that a fairy tale, which has entertained millions of children, has been lost to political correctness gone so very wrong.

Louise Boyd, Adamstown HeightsTHE POLLSSHOULD Defence Minister Marise Payne attend the meeting in Williamtown on Thursday?

Yes 86%,No 14%MESSAGEBOARDCESSNOCK Prostate Cancer Support Group meets on April 27 at Cessnock Leagues Club from 3pm. Guest: Jenny Noblet from Hunter Melanoma Foundation. Topic: Melanoma prevention and why early detection is so vital. Meetings are open to all and the cost is free. For information contact Rose 4990 4554 or Barry 0439 404 554.

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